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NeuroPerspective Single Issues/Other Subscriptions

Recent issues of NeuroPerspective are available for purchase on a single-purchase basis:

NP on Alzheimer's and FTD $650.00

The September/October 2018 issue of NeuroPerspective has been released, featuring the newest iteration of our annual candid and comprehensive review of the Alzheimer's space, including a review of the current conceptual trends vis-a-vis pathophysiology and therapeutic targets. In particular, this year there is an expanded assessment of neuro-immunology as it pertains to Alzheimer's, including infection models of AD and tactics for modulating microglial activity. The subtitle for the review is  'Circular Illogic', because despite our past observations of the need for recalibration in the pursuit of AD, there is still more investment in amyloid-centric programs than is warranted by the data generated thus far. Among the 150+ programs are assessed are those from: AbbVie, Alector, AC Immune, AgeneBio, Allergan, Alkahest, Anavex, Asceneuron,  Axon-Neuroscience, Biogen, Cognition Therapeutics, Cortexyme, Denali, Eisai, E-Scape, Genentech, Intra-Cellular, JNJ, Karuna, Klogene, Lilly, Lundbeck, Merck, Novartis, Oryzon, Pfizer, Probiodrug, Proclara, ProMIS, Roche, Takeda,  United Neuroscience, and Voyager. Alector is the focus of the Company Review, sidebars include coverage of the current state of the AD Biomarker art and an overview of the POC timelines for major AD programs. The Sept/Oct issue also includes a full review of Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD), including an evaluation of the complex heterogeneity within this umbrella category, with marked divergences in genotype and phenotypic signs. FTD programs are evaluated, including those from AbbVie/Alector, Biogen, Axovant/Benitec, Aquinnah, and Wave Life Sciences/Takeda. 75 pages. 

NeuroPerspective on Schizophrenia and Stroke $600.00

The March/April 2019 issue of NeuroPerspective  has been released, offering detailed reviews of two therapeutic areas, as well as coverage and commentary regarding significant developments in the CNS therapeutics space. The first therapeutic sector review covers Schizophrenia, the most devastating of all the psychiatric disorders, one which comprises the awkward melding of multiple schizophreniform phenotypes with very divergent symptom patterns. Affecting about 1% of the population, schizophrenia's genetic vulnerabilities are complex and contribute to schizophrenia's etiological confluence of genetic flaws, prenatal/perinatal environmental factors, and later anomalies in the formation and 'editing' of synaptic networks. At its root, schizophrenia most likely arises from neurodevelopmental failure exacerbated by the degenerative impact of aberrant adolescent synaptic 'pruning,' perhaps reflecting aberrant neuroinflammatory/immune system activity. Network deficits account for the neural dyscontrol that sets the stage for hallucinations/delusions, and for the impoverishment of cognitive capabilities and motivation. While there is promising work on neuroinflammation currently ongoing, with a predominant focus on neurodegeneration (e.g. Alector, Annexon, Denali), the potential application of that work to schizophrenia lags far behind. Symptomatic treatments for schizophrenia are still the currency of the clinical practice and clinical development realms: Current therapeutics are almost solely aimed at the so-called positive symptoms of schizophrenia, there has been no real success developing treatments for the cognitive and negative symptoms that take such a functional toll, even when the more florid symptoms of schizophrenia are relatively controlled. Some of the companies whose programs are discussed in the review include: Biogen,Intra-Cellular Therapies, Karuna Pharmaceuticals, Cerevel, Allergan, Boehringer Ingelheim, Sage Therapeutics, Lundbeck, Takeda,  Acadia, Promentis, Newron,  Syndesi, SyneuRx, and Sunovion.   The second therapeutic sector review covers Stroke, an area which became anathema to the pharma industry after a series of clinical failures 15-20 years ago. With almost 800,000 stroke cases annually in the US alone, this neglect (which had left stroke R&D primarily the province of endovascular device companies) has been untenable in the long run. Biogen is the first of the major pharma companies to make a return to stroke, via partnerships with Remedy and TMS. There is work on extending the window for thrombolytic interventions (ActiCor, Biogen), solving the seemingly intractable puzzle of neuroprotection (NoNO, AdMIRx, Avilex, ZZ Biotech), and a growing emphasis on repair/regeneration, particularly by the several cell therapy companies engaged in that work (Athersys, SanBio, NeuralStem, ReNeuron). Programs from BioAxone and Idorsia address hemorrhagic stroke. Other companies and academic centers whose programs are discussed in this review include: UCLA, ArunA, NeurOp).  The March/April issue also includes discussion of recent clinical findings from companies addressing depression (JNJ/Janssen, Sage Therapeutics,Axsome, Blackthorn Therapeutics); high-innovation partnerships for Voyager with AbbVie and with Neurocrine, Biogen with C4T and Skyhawk, and possible salvation for the  PTSD program from Bionomics.  The Company Spotlight Review covers SyneuRx, which is in PhII/III trials using sodium benzoate/NaBen for schizophrenia and dementia.

MS and Insomnia Reviewed 2019 $600.00

The first therapeutic sector review covers Multiple Sclerosis, which to some degree represents the kind of therapeutic efficacy and choices that the rest of the neurotherapeutics area aspires to achieve, but remains problematic for some populations and in the risk-benefit profiles available for the disease modifiers. Biogen's commercial dominance is  being threatened by the highly successful advent of Roche's Ocrevus and what will eventually turn into a  parade of patent expirations.  Progressive MS, both Primary and Secondary, has only begun to be addressed by Ocrevus and Mayzent, and with far less impact than can be brought to bear on Relapsing-Remitting MS. Even in RRMS, patients have generally had to confront a choice between efficacy and safety, where the most impactful therapeutics also come with the most dire adverse event risks (e.g. Tysabri and PML). Beyond disease-slowing, MS is the context where regenerative therapies are most likely to first make their mark in the neuro field, with remyelination high on the priority list. In terms of high profile programs, the development of new targets in neuroinflammation is very applicable to MS, with programs from Sanofi/Denali, Merck KGa, Annexon, and Disarm Therapeutics among the most interesting approaches. Remyelination/regeneration is the goal of programs from AbbVie, Biogen, and Roche/Inception 5, with ‘inhibiting the inhibitors’ and fostering oligodendrocyte differentiation standing out as the primary tactics. The second therapeutic sector review covers Insomnia, an area which is dominated by GABAergic generics, but is also the context for the therapeutic elucidation of the orexin receptor system as a means of modulating wakefulness and sleep. There is  an active debate as to how best utilize the orexin system, via dual receptor agonists, as was the case with Merck’s Belsomra (as well as Eisai/Purdue, Idorsia), or selective orexin-2 agonists, such as Minerva Neuroscience’s seltorexant. The FDA’s priorities have gone somewhat askew in the insomnia field, with a preoccupation with rare side effects and subtle decrements in ‘next-day driving’, which are less of a real-life problem than untreated insomnia and the heavy reliance upon OTC soporifics which have substantial next-day residual effects. The May/June issue also includes discussion of recent developments for companies addressing depression (JNJ/Janssen, Allergan); substantial doubts regarding the viability of NGF mAbs in pain; and the obstacles the FDA has been presenting to pain companies, particularly in the ‘abuse-deterrent’ space.

NP on Depression/PTSD Mar/Apr 2018 $600.00

The March/April 2018 issue of NeuroPerspective features in-depth reviews of Depression and PTSD.Depression represents a patient population whose treatment falls far short of the bucolic illustrations suggested by DTC advertising for the current crop of pharmacotherapies. The majority of patients do not find adequate relief from their first trial, and 25% do not find sufficient benefit from any of the antidepressants they try. Aversive side effects, including weight gain and sexual dysfunction, form a significant barrier to utilization, and the long delay to relief is counter-therapeutic. New drugs seem to offer the prospect of near-immediate depression relief, led by the much-publicized impact of IV ketamine. Prominent RAAD programs come from JNJ (whose Phase III results have been delayed without explanation); Allergan; the surprising SAGE Therapeutics program; and potentially, Perception NeuroScience, to name but four. Suicide risk represents a growing societal problem, as is Treatment-Resistant Depression, where nothing seems to work. SAGE has made significant progress with Post-Partum Depression, with Marinus Pharmaceuticals hoping to follow suit. Other antidepressant programs reviewed include those from Alkermes, Blackthorn Therapeutics, NeuralStem, Navitor. PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder) has risen in profile as a result of both natural (tsunamis, firestorms) and human-made (combat, mass shootings) disasters, and the more pervasive but lower profile scourge of sexual/physical/emotional abuse of both children and adults. The pharma industry has generally taken a passive approach to PTSD, leaving the funding of research to the DoD and VA in the US, but small companies are beginning to explore this undertreated and very large-scale domain: Aptinyx, Azevan, Marinus, Rodin, SpringWorks, Tonix Pharma. Interventions can be focused upon attenuating the limbic system hyperactivation of PTSD and/or accentuating the cognitive rewriting of traumatic memory. The March/April issue also discusses Pfizer’s CNS retreat; Axovant’s failure; the ‘revision’ of FDA guidelines for Alzheimer’s; and the several high-quality, pioneering partnerships signed in recent months: Takeda with both Denali and Wave Life Sciences, AbbVie with Voyager Therapeutics. 55 pages.

NP on Addiction/Anxiety: May/June 2018 $0.00

FREE SAMPLE ISSUE:The May/June 2018 issue of NeuroPerspective  takes NP into a world of internal contradictions, in an issue that features reviews of Addiction and Anxiety. Addiction receives enormous press coverage in the US, but a relatively paltry slice of the federal funding pie, and a pathetically infinitesimal portion of pharma's R&D outlays. There is a surfeit of hand-wringing and blame-placing, but  little more than window-dressing when it comes to putting actual resources to the task. NIDA has done exemplary work in keeping the lights on for Addictions research, but hardly at the scale necessary given the scope of the disorder. Crowd-funding Narcan is not a strategy, it is a illustration of individuals trying to compensate for societal negligence. This is the first time that NIR has reviewed the field of Addiction since the November/December 2015 issue, and during that time, the 'Opioid Epidemic' in America has finally percolated into public awareness. In so doing, it has moved opioid addiction from its former subsistence at the murky margins of contemporary society right to the core, reflecting the decimation of neighborhoods and families across the full spectrum of socioeconomic strata. This review details the neurophysiology and therapeutic approaches to opioid addiction, and  its substance abuse siblings: Alcohol, Nicotine, and Stimulants (cocaine and methamphetamine). Therapeutic programs from Addex, Braeburn, Embera, Indivior, MediciNova, Opiant, and Savant are among those reviewed in the review. Anxiety is similarly underaddressed given its prevalence: The number of individuals in the US, EU, and Japan with anxiety disorders is in the many tens of millions.  The reality is that the majority of those with anxiety disorders suffer through them, because the available treatment options are either inadequate (pharmacotherapy) or under-funded by payors (psychotherapy). And the pharma industry? There is hardly any Big Pharma activity in pursuit of anxiolysis, and not much more than that from small biotech/biopharm companies. Programs from Addex, Aptinyx, Azevan, Bionomics, Idorsia, JNJ, and SpringWorks are among those covered, with this work at times overlapping with the work on PTSD therapeutics covered in the March/April issue. The May/June issue also discusses Biohaven’s rimegepant results; Alkermes and the FDA; and the 'Billions' invested by Novartis and Biogen in AveXis and Ionis. Company reviews for Opiant and Bionomics are included. The May/June 2018 issue of NeuroPerspective  takes NP into a world of internal contradictions, in an issue that features reviews of Addiction and Anxiety. Addiction receives enormous press coverage in the US, but a relatively paltry slice of the federal funding pie, and a pathetically infinitesimal portion of pharma's R&D outlays. There is a surfeit of hand-wringing and blame-placing, but  little more than window-dressing when it comes to putting actual resources to the task. NIDA has done exemplary work in keeping the lights on for Addictions research, but hardly at the scale necessary given the scope of the disorder. Crowd-funding Narcan is not a strategy, it is a illustration of individuals trying to compensate for societal negligence. This is the first time that NIR has reviewed the field of Addiction since the November/December 2015 issue, and during that time, the 'Opioid Epidemic' in America has finally percolated into public awareness. In so doing, it has moved opioid addiction from its former subsistence at the murky margins of contemporary society right to the core, reflecting the decimation of neighborhoods and families across the full spectrum of socioeconomic strata. This review details the neurophysiology and therapeutic approaches to opioid addiction, and  its substance abuse siblings: Alcohol, Nicotine, and Stimulants (cocaine and methamphetamine). Therapeutic programs from Addex, Braeburn, Embera, Indivior, MediciNova, Opiant, and Savant are among those reviewed in the review. Anxiety is similarly underaddressed given its prevalence: The number of individuals in the US, EU, and Japan with anxiety disorders is in the many tens of millions.  The reality is that the majority of those with anxiety disorders suffer through them, because the available treatment options are either inadequate (pharmacotherapy) or under-funded by payors (psychotherapy). And the pharma industry? There is hardly any Big Pharma activity in pursuit of anxiolysis, and not much more than that from small biotech/biopharm companies. Programs from Addex, Aptinyx, Azevan, Bionomics, Idorsia, JNJ, and SpringWorks are among those covered, with this work at times overlapping with the work on PTSD therapeutics covered in the March/April issue. The May/June issue also discusses Biohaven’s rimegepant results; Alkermes and the FDA; and the 'Billions' invested by Novartis and Biogen in AveXis and Ionis. Company reviews for Opiant and Bionomics are included.

NP on Pain $500.00

The November/December issue of NeuroPerspective features  a comprehensive review of the Pain space, divided into two major sub-sections, Nociceptive (including Inflammatory) Pain and Neuropathic Pain. Even as attention has necessarily been focused upon the Opioid Epidemic that had its roots in an overreliance upon  prescription opioid analgesics, the Pain field has yet to develop non-opioid alternatives that provide sufficient analgesia for severe pain. Some companies have focused upon developing modestly-less-abuse-prone opioid reformulations, these have failed to impress regulators or prescribers. Trevena's 'biased agonists' represented an unacceptable trade-off of efficacy for safety, while NGF antibodies have had a torturous path through clinical and regulatory challenges, and are burdened by their own safety risks. Extending the range of short-acting anesthetics in order to circumvent the need for post-operative opioids is a strategy that has shown some promise. Neuropathic pain is in some ways even more ephemeral and frustrating, there has yet to be a 'gold standard' for neuropathic pain, which comes in several major sub-varieties, and for which current treatments tend to offer only partial relief to a minority of patients. Among the 60+  programs are assessed are those from: Centrexion, Lilly/AstraZeneca, Teva/Regeneron, Trevena, Vertex, Cara Therapeutics, Wex Pharmaceuticals, Mesoblast, Adynnx, Recro, Novartis/Spinifex, Xenon, Astraea, Coda Therapeutics,  Aptinyx, and Amgen. The Boehringer Ingelheim licensing agenda is excerpted from NeuroLicensing 2018-19. Sidebars  include coverage of JNJ esketamine program in depression; competition rapidly pursuing Biogen's Spinraza, the ambiguity of Eisai/Biogen's BAN2401 data in Alzheimer's, and the ADCOM rebuff of Alkermes' highly flawed NDA submission for ALKS 5461. 53 pages.

Parkinson's and ALS Reviewed Nov/Dec 2017 $600.00

The November/December issue of NeuroPerspective features our comprehensive reviews for two major neurodegenerative disorders: Parkinson’s and ALS. These reviews include a consideration of the current thinking around pathophysiology and therapeutic targets, including the protein culprits commonly associated with these disorders: Alpha-synuclein, TDP-43, and c9orf72. Neuroinflammation, the gut-brain microbiome, and other mechanisms of current interest are included. Progress in the delineation of biomarkers and models is discussed. The Parkinson’s review includes 140+ programs, including PD development programs from AbbVie, AC Immune, Affiris, Allergan/Lysosomal, Biogen, Cantabio, Biogen, Denali, Genentech, ImStar, Intra-Cellular, JNJ, Lundbeck, Minerva, Neurocrine, Prothena/Roche, and Voyager. The ALS review includes 75+ programs, including those from AB Science, Aquinnah Pharma, Arrakis, Astellas/Cytokinetics, Biogen/Ionis, Califia, Denali/Incro, Gladstone Institute, ImStar, Iron Horse Therapeutics, Locana, Neuraltus, Neurimmune, Voyager Therapeutics, and Wave Life Sciences. Cantabio Pharma is the focus of the Company Review. Sidebars include a more detailed look at the failure of the SAGE brexanolone trial in SRSE; ethical issues around Avanir’s marketing of Nuedexta; and Axovant’s failure in Alzheimer’s. 65 pages.

NeuroPerspective on HD and Epilepsy $500.00

The March/April issue of NeuroPerspective for 2017 offers detailed reviews of HD and Elilepsy. Huntington’s offers more mechanistic clarity than its neurodegenerative peers, though the route from genotype to phenotype remains to-be-defined, and the mHtt target grows more complex and multi-faceted the more that it comes into focus. Operating against the genetic anomaly would require the selective sparing of necessary wild-type Htt, and the delivery of large molecules through the BBB and deep into the brain. Which means that upstream clarity does not easily translate into downstream impact. The size of the Huntington’s-yet-to-emerge patient universe is in the 150-200,000 range in the US, making this far more than a minor market for any company that can develop a disease-slowing treatment. Such a drug would be administered early, and perhaps chronically. The advent of a disease-modifier would also invert the risk-benefit calculations involved in genetic testing: The diagnosis would finally be more than an incontrovertible harbinger of personal doom. Some of the companies whose programs are discussed in the review include: Annexon Biosciences, Proclara, Roche/Ionis, Wave Life Sciences, Spark Therapeutics, Teva, UniQure, Voyager, Prana, Evotec/CHDI, and Vaccinex. The second therapeutic sector review is on Epilepsy: The current armamentarium of anti-epileptic drugs offer numerous variations on a few main themes; none of which have proven superior across the board; and which singly or in combination, provide adequate control for just 70-80% of epilepsy patients. For a patient formerly refractory to drug treatment, achieving seizure control, via monotherapy or adjuncts, can be a life-saving event, literally and figuratively. Improving tolerability, and reducing teratogenicity and/or weight gain, would also improve treatment compliance and outcome.The most dramatic advances on tap for the next few years involve relatively small, but severely-impacted subpopulations. Severe Refractory Status Epilepticus appears solvable for many via SAGE-547, while significant (though far from ideal) inroads are now being made with Dravet Syndrome and Lennox-Gestaut, generally refractory to intervention, by companies like GW Pharma and Zogenix. Big Pharma has largely withdrawn from the development of epilepsy drugs, as exemplified by Lilly's outlicensing LY3130418 to Cerecor, and JNJ/Janssen not pursuing its own promising TARP/AMPA inhibitors. In contrast, UCB Pharma has made epilepsy the centerpiece of its research and commercial strategy, although recent partnerships have been turned to neurodegeneration as they gradually broaden their focus. Of the other companies tracked in NeuroLicensing 2016-17, only Dainippon/Sunovion and Otsuka cited Epilepsy as an area where they have licensing interests. This means that drug development for Epilepsy has become the province of small and mid-sized specialty companies, and funding has not been easily found, in spite of the unmet needs that continue to be high-profile in this population. The companies whose programs are discussed in this review include: SAGE Therapeutics, GW Pharma, UCB Pharma, Marinus Pharmaceuticals, Zogenix, Epalex, Cerecor, Tansna Therapeutics, Zynerba, Catalyst Pharma, SK Biopharma, Neurona Therapeutics, and Adamas Pharmaceuticals. The March/April issue also includes discussion of recent clinical findings from Trevena, Merck, Acorda, and Celgene, as well as commentary on the pricing debacle at Marathon Pharmaceuticals and questions regarding Alcobra’s revised strategy. Company Spotlight Reviews are included for Wave Life Sciences and Trevena.

15 user subscription $7,200.00

One year subscription to NeuroPerspective, 11-15 users

Global License $20,000.00

The global license option permits unlimited sharing of NP issues within the Company.

NL2020thumb NeuroLicensing 2020 $3,500.00

NeuroLicensing 2020 will be completely revised and updated, analyzing current trends in CNS deal parameters, providing candid assessments of the major and midsize companies involved in CNS inlicensing. Licensing agendas and performance will be reviewed and appraised. NL 2020 will provide a vital resource for licensing efforts on both sides of the transaction, both licensors and licensees. 100+ pages. To be released November 2019. Five-user (within one Company) subscription license:$3500 (pre-release; post-release price will be $4000).